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Battle Tactics For Your Sexist Work Place Eula Scott Bynoe and Jeannie Yandel
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

We start the show today with a recording of a graphic description of assault. If you want to skip it, jump ahead about 20 seconds.

As a nation, we could do a better job at taking time off.

About half of full-time workers recently surveyed by the U.S. Travel Association didn't take all the paid vacation days they earned last year.

More than 700 million vacation days went unused, and we forfeited about 200 million of those days — when vacation benefits didn't roll over. On average, American workers took almost six fewer vacation days than we earned.

marijuana joint pot
Flickr Photo/Dann Cove (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Washington state is dealing with a lot of weed waste — and we're not talking about the stuff you dig out of  your yard.

Our legal marijuana industry is creating a new waste problem. Seattle journalist Kristen Millares Young covered the story for The Washington Post and spoke to KUOW’s Angela King about it.


After working at a call center for two decades, Linda Bradley's job came to an end about a year and a half ago. Since her layoff, she has combed online job sites every day looking for work — without much luck.

Bradley, who is 45 and lives near Columbus, Ohio, began suspecting age discrimination after someone at her union mentioned how recruiters often target online ads at younger candidates. "I thought to myself, 'Oh, that's why I wasn't seeing some of the ads that my daughter has seen on her Facebook,' " she says.

Tinder's co-founders, along with eight other current and former executives, have slapped the popular dating app's owners with a massive lawsuit. In the suit filed Tuesday in New York, the Tinder employees past and present say the companies that own the app deliberately undervalued it to swindle them out of the money they were owed.

What the transformed Northgate Mall could look like, at least according to architects. This is the view from the southeast.
Courtesy of GGLO

Would you live at the mall, if you could?

Light rail is coming to Northgate in three years, and it'll result in a whole new mall experience there.


Seven-year-old Aviana Conyers bounces around the bustling back-to-school aisles of a Walmart Supercenter. She grabs her second-grade supply list from her mother, Andrea.

"Mama, do you have any pencils in your bag?" Aviana asks, eager to cross off items on the list.

To tell how the nation's first black beer festival came to be held in Pittsburgh, you might start with a beer.

Maybe it was that introductory Sam Adams Boston Lager that longtime Michelob and Heineken guy Mike Potter drank more than a decade ago. "It had a completely different profile, a completely different taste, you know, completely different aroma," he says. "It just elevated my curiosity."

A poster attached to a telephone pole shows KUOW's original story on Tuesday, August 7, 2018, near the intersection of East Olive Way and Summit Avenue East in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

If you've walked around Capitol Hill lately, you might have seen large signs on telephone poles.

BOYCOTT LOST LAKE CAFE, they say - with a screenshot of an article about rape accusations against cafe owner Dave Meinert.

Amazon says it removed several items of racist propaganda from its store in response to questions from a Democratic lawmaker — though white supremacist literature and other propaganda items remain widely available on the site.

After criticism from advocacy groups and Minnesota Democratic Rep. Keith Ellison about the availability of Nazi-themed toys and baby onesies with pictures of burning crosses on Amazon's website, the company said this week that it had removed several items and banned sellers who had violated its policies.

A basic tenet of economics is that when demand for something goes up, so does its cost. So, many economists wonder why today's high demand for workers hasn't translated into bigger increases in pay.

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell has called this a puzzle that defies a single or easy explanation. It isn't just, for example, that productivity has slowed, making it harder for businesses to justify paying more — though that is certainly a factor.

A national shortage of anesthesia and pain medications have put providers in a tough spot, including in obstetrics. Collage
KUOW Illustration/Isolde Raftery

The supply room for drugs at Wenatchee LifeLine, a rural ambulance service, is bare. Morphine is scant. Bags of saline are precious.

Natasha and Brent Weled outside the courthouse in Issaquah, where they presented a case against Allied Residential, their former landlord.
KUOW Photo/Anna Boiko-Weyrauch

Natasha Weled was on guard.

It was February, and she was moving out of her two-bedroom apartment in Bellevue, and the property manager had stood her up for the final walk-through — twice.


The craft brewing industry in the Pacific Northwest is starting to feel pain from the Trump administration's steel and aluminum tariffs. Those metals are made into beer cans, kegs and fermentation tanks.

Kristen Scott, partner at Weber Thompson, stands in front of the courtyard/thermal chimney that draws a breeze across her office in lieu of air conditioning
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

It’s hot outside. In most offices in Seattle, air conditioning keeps the employees cool. That’s not happening at the architecture firm Weber Thompson. 


It's hard enough for employers to find workers to fill open jobs these days, but on top of it, many prospective hires are failing drug tests.

The Belden electric wire factory in Richmond, Ind., is taking a novel approach to both problems: It now offers drug treatment, paid for by the company, to job applicants who fail the drug screen. Those who complete treatment are also promised a job.

Pedraam Faridjoo of Kensington, Md., is spending his summer volunteering and traveling. Ryan Abshire from Carmel, Ind., is using the time to be with his family. Meme Etheridge of St. Simons Island, Ga., is attending a music camp where she plays percussion.

What do they all have in common? They're teenagers, and they are not working summer jobs.

A summer job, like lifeguarding or scooping ice cream, used to be a rite of passage for teens. Thirty years ago, nearly two-thirds of U.S. teenagers worked summer jobs. Twenty years ago, more than half of them did.

President Trump is eager to tout a fast-growing economy, boosted by the tax cuts he pushed through Congress. That makes Friday morning's report on gross domestic product a highly anticipated news event.

Did GDP growth top 4 percent in the second quarter — more than double the first-quarter pace — as many economists project?

Forecasts are all over the board, with estimates even among Federal Reserve economists diverging widely.

The events of 10 years ago show why these forecasts are so important.

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Ever felt unqualified for a job — even after you were hired? Are you convinced one day everyone at work will discover you know NOTHING?

Take a breath. And listen:


Courtesy Seattle Department of Transportation

On Tuesday, Mayor Jenny Durkan released a new update from the city's ongoing review of the Seattle streetcar's downtown connector project: an estimated cost of more than $200 million, and the new cars might not even fit the existing track.

But there are other problems with the streetcar, too. The main one: ridership.

Flickr Photo/SounderBruce (CC BY 2.0) https://bit.ly/2NMBy2C

The true cost of the Seattle streetcar's Center City Connector project may be well over $200 million. That's the latest from Mayor Jenny Durkan's office.

Eula Scott Bynoe and Jeannie Yandel
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

80% of us have experienced imposter syndrome at some point... which is cold comfort when you're the one on the spot, wondering why on earth you were ever hired and when they're going to find out you're a fraud. 

KUOW podcast Battle Tactics for Your Sexist Workplace to the rescue! This week's episode includes tactics about how to counter your brain's fear of being exposed as unqualified.

Boeing

New high-speed passenger planes being designed by Boeing and other manufacturers could connect continents faster than ever before.

But these supersonic and “hypersonic” planes could also wreck the global climate faster than other means of travel. 


Look people in the eye. Smile. Shake hands. Sit up tall. Speak clearly and confidently.

That's the last-minute advice professor Paul Calhoun gives a handful of college students before they head off for a series of job interviews. The Skidmore College juniors and seniors he's talking to are dressed in suits and button-downs; dresses and heels. They stand out in a college library swimming with other finals-takers, most in sweatpants or leggings and T-shirts.

Academic researchers will soon have access to a vast amount of Facebook's user data.
Flickr Photo/Andrew Feinberg (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4xvBtj

Facebook is sharing its user data with an external research group, which will mine it for details about how people use the site.

Sound familiar?


City Light Superintendent Gordon Vickery with a prototype AMC Gremlin electric car, 1973
Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/UYLihW

Tesla tried to go mass market last year by starting production on the Model 3 – price tag starting at $35,000.

It didn’t go well. 

KUOW Graphic/Brie Ripley

Do you know someone who is battling sexism at work? Someone who is smashing the patriarchy not just in their 9 to 5, but also in their neighborhood and all through cyberspace — and WINNING?

Tell us about them. And by them we mean she/her, he/him, they/them. Oh, it’s YOU? Tell us about your rad self, too.

Netflix says its faulty forecasting caused it to miss its target for new subscribers, falling short by more than a million even as it reported quarterly earnings that beat analysts' expectations.

Target is building a tiny store in Seattle' s U-District
Rendering by Target

For some, this story could be just one sentence punctuated with approximately 28 exclamation points: Target is coming to the University District.


Ruth Bader Ginsburg is not here for your interrupting nonsense.
Flickr Photo/Stanford Law (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/fYkEXZ

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is known for her fiery written dissents. But she might have honed that talent, in part, because she couldn't get a word in edgewise.


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