Casey Martin | KUOW News and Information

Casey Martin

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2015

Casey is a features and daily news reporter at KUOW.

Since starting at KUOW he has produced Morning Edition and All Things Considered, announced, produced stories for The Record, and reported for Local Wonder.

His story, "The Good, The Bad, The Libre," was a finalist for the 2017 KCRW 24-Hour Radio Race.

Casey started in public radio at KBCS Community Radio in Bellevue. He learned how to make radio on a magical island at the Transom Traveling Workshop.

To see more of Casey's KUOW portfolio, visit our current site. 

KUOW reporter Casey Martin, right, gets instruction with Spence Campbell of Aviation Training Center on how to use a flight simulator to fly a Bombardier Q400 on Tuesday, August 14, 2018.
KUOW photo/Casey Martin

The man who stole a plane from Sea-Tac Airport Friday didn't have a pilot's license.

How could he have learned to fly? I went to flight school to find out.  


The site on Ketron Island in Washington state where an Horizon Air turboprop plane crashed Friday after it was stolen from Sea-Tac International Airport is seen from the air, Saturday, Aug. 11, 2018, near Steilacoom, Wash.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

The FBI said it has found human remains at the crash site of a stolen Horizon Air passenger plane.

Richard “Beebo” Russell is believed to have stolen the twin-engine Bombardier Q400 from Sea-Tac Airport Friday night.


Seattle Police Department

A Belltown nightclub was raided this week after a months-long drug trafficking investigation.

Police started investigating Foundation Nightclub in March after reports of drug dealing and sexual assault inside the club.


KUOW PHOTO / CASEY MARTIN

At Pearl Jam’s first Home Show Wednesday night, front man Eddie Vedder dedicated their hit song, “Evenflow,” to another Eddie.


Traffic on Second Avenue in downtown Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Oran Viriyincy (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1irsJLd

“Why are Seattle drivers the worst?”

That’s a question we get a lot from listeners.

But when cities are ranked by number of accidents, speeding tickets, or DUIs, Seattle rarely comes in first.

So why do Seattleites feel like they’re surrounded by bad drivers?

Smoke from an approaching wildfire looms over a home near Twisp, Wash., Aug. 19, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Firefighters should rethink how they battle wildfires. 

That's according to environmental journalist Richard Manning who just wrote a piece in Harper's Magazine titled "Combustion Engines."


A woman holds a sign asking "Where are the children?" at the Stop Separating Immigrant Families Press Conference and Rally in Chicago on June 5th, 2018.
Flickr Photo/Charles Edward Miller (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/JifDxM

Today is the deadline for the Trump administration to finish reunifying families it separated at the border. Meghan Casey of the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project is an advocate whose client has not yet been reunited with her child, and has been tracking the numbers of families impacted in Washington State.

Courtesy of Horizon House

Skydiving is a once in a lifetime experience for most people, but not for Seattleite Stuart Williamson. He jumped last year for the first time, on his birthday, at Harvey Field in Snohomish.

Williamson took another jump yesterday, again on his birthday — his 100th birthday.

Edmonds City Council President Mike Nelson demonstrates how he uses a safe for his pistol.
KUOW Photo/Casey Martin

The city of Edmonds could soon fine people who don't lock up their firearms.

The ordinance is being proposed by a gun owner.


KUOW PHOTO/Casey Martin

Edmonds Lutheran Church is installing a new home on their property for people experiencing homelessness. 

It’s a rectangular, 260-square-foot studio apartment with water and electricity. 


Flickr Photo/James Nord (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/79M3aL

Now it’s Washington state whiskey distillers who are feeling the sting of the tariff battle.


Jenny Durkan at her election night party on Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2017
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan is reiterating her plan to cut the budget of every department in the city.

Speaking on KUOW's The Record on Thursday, Durkan declined to specify how steep the cuts will be, but she did say spending reductions will vary depending on department.


KUOW PHOTO / Casey Martin

While many people were barbecuing and playing in the sun for the Fourth of July, hundreds in Seattle became new U.S. citizens.


Courtesy of Jacob Wesley Sutton

In the wake of school shootings like the one in Parkland, Florida this year, parents are asking: "How do I talk to my child about mass shootings?"

KUOW helped answer that question with a story we did in March.


Jud Yoho, who sold Craftsman houses at the turn of the century, lived in this 1911 bungalow in Wallingford. The house was recently listed for $599,000.
KUOW File Photo/Isolde Raftery

It's that time of year again when King County sends out property value assessments to homes and businesses.


The stars-and-bars of the Confederate flag painted onto a Juanita senior's face in 1999. Two years earlier, Juanita students shouted racial slurs at the mostly black Garfield High School football team. They sent an apology banner and students had to atten
KUOW Photo/Casey Martin

The Rebel remains.

Students at Juanita High School, in Kirkland, have voted overwhelmingly to keep their controversial mascot.

Members of NWDC Resistance chant during the Solidarity Day protest outside of the Federal Detention Center in SeaTac.
Daniel Berman for KUOW

The dozens of moms jailed in SeaTac didn’t realize what was happening when they were torn from their children.


The stars-and-bars of the Confederate flag painted onto a Juanita senior's face in 1999. Two years earlier, Juanita students shouted racial slurs at the mostly black Garfield High School football team. They sent an apology banner and students had to atten
KUOW Photo/Casey Martin

A Kirkland high school voted today, Thursday, on whether to drop their mascot: the Rebels.

Apples at the Olympia Farmers Market.
Flickr Photo/WSDA (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ZsGd1C

U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum went into effect Friday for Canada, the European Union and Mexico. That decision by the Trump Administration could now hurt one of Washington state's signature exports: apples. 


KUOW PHOTO / CASEY MARTIN

An American flag for every grave marker in Seattle's Evergreen Washelli Veterans Memorial Cemetery. 

That was the mission for dozens of volunteers at 7 o'clock Monday morning. 

Veterans, scouting troops, and family of service members scooped up their flags and started walking the rows, planting one U.S. flag for each white marble gravestone. 

Over 5000 times, in all.


Ronda Broatch

News stories can be disturbing sometimes, but KUOW has a way to help process these stories.

We call it #NewsPoet — and it involves a Pacific Northwest poet writing an original piece inspired by one of our stories.

Today we revisit the story about the last man to be put to death by Washington state.


Martin Ramirez says the Woodland Park Zoo is planning to allow visitors to touch the two rhinos.
KUOW Photo/Casey Martin

It seems just about everyone's moving to Seattle these days, and now that includes rhinoceri.

Two baby rhinos, named Taj and Glenn, are now permanent residents at Woodland Park Zoo.


Larches, a staple of the North Cascades, are shown on the Pacifc Crest Trail near Cutthroat Pass.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

The North Cascades National Park turns 50 years old this year.

It's a popular place to camp and hike now, but a new book about the park's history says it got off to a rocky start. 


KUOW PHOTO / CASEY MARTIN

How many different plant and animal species exist in the Puget Sound region?

That's what hundreds of volunteers have been trying to answer as part of the international competition known as the City Nature Challenge.


Mount Rainier, or Tahoma, Tacobet, Ti'Swaq or Pooskaus.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Your list of errands for the weekend might include picking up a prescription — but just imagine if that meant going for a walk in the woods.

For some, that's exactly what the doctor ordered.

Sunday is National Park Prescriptions Day, which encourages health care providers to prescribe time in nature to reduce stress and improve patient health. 


Kelli Russell Agodon is a poet based in Kingston, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Casey Martin

Starting this month KUOW is celebrating local poetry with a series called #NewsPoet.

A Pacific Northwest poet writes an original piece inspired by a KUOW news story. This week we hear from Kingston-based poet Kelli Russel Agodon.


Katy Ellis is a mother and dedicated her poem to Charleena Lyles who was pregnant when she was killed.
KUOW PHOTO/CASEY MARTIN

The news can be troubling and sometimes disturbing. 

For poets it can be a source of inspiration. To help process the stories in our news feeds, we invite poets to write an original piece inspired by a KUOW story for #NewsPoet.


FLICKR PHOTO/GOODIEZ (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Two reports released this month showed a decline in opioid prescriptions in states that have legalized medical marijuana.

One report looked at Medicaid enrollees, the other people on Medicare.

Both reports find medical pot can encourage lower prescription opioid use and serve as a harm abatement tool in the opioid crisis.

Dr. Andrew Saxon is a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the University of Washington and director of the Addiction Psychiatry Residency Program at the University.

He tells KUOW's Marcie Sillman the reports support alternatives to opioid prescriptions but the addiction crisis is far from solved.

KUOW PHOTO / CASEY MARTIN

Lovable losers? Newbies with something to prove? A town on the cusp of reclaiming its glory?

Seattle sports fans, it's time to talk about who we are.

Let's dig into the city’s sports identity with panelists Michael-Shawn Dugar, Kate Preusser, and Geoff Baker. They cover everything from the new rugby team, impassioned Sounders fans and athletes reflecting fans' values.


Seattle lost a civil rights icon this weekend.

The Reverend Dr. Samuel B. McKinney died Saturday. He was 91. 

KUOW's Marcie Sillman spoke with arts advocate and former Seattle Arts Commission chair, Vivian Phillips, who knew McKinney personally about his life and work. 

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