Patricia Murphy | KUOW News and Information

Patricia Murphy

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2000

Patricia Murphy is a feature reporter for KUOW. Patricia reports on criminal justice and public health. Previously she was part of two collaborative projects focusing on military and veterans.  The American Homefront Project is a partnership between public radio stations KUOW, WUNC, KPCC and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Back at Base is a collaboration between National Public Radio and seven member stations including KUOW.  

Patricia is an award-winning radio journalist. Patricia’s first job in radio news was at WBUR Boston in 1994. She’s worked at KUOW since 2000.

Patricia’s series “Less than Honorable,” investigated how the military handles more than 3,000 sexual assault cases each year. Her 2011 collaboration with the Seattle Times, “The Weight of War,” looked at heavy loads carried by troops and the increase in chronic orthopedic injuries as a result; the series won a national award for Excellence in Health Care Journalism from the Association of Healthcare Journalists. She also received a national Edward R. Murrow Award for a documentary on IV drug use and has had her work recognized with awards from the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Society of Professional Journalists.

In 2012, Patricia was inducted into the Dart Society, a network of journalists who cover trauma, conflict and social injustice.

To see more of Patricia's KUOW portfolio, visit our current site. 

Patricia holds a B.S. from Emerson College in Boston.

Ways to Connect

FLICKR PHOTO/J. Stephen Conn (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/94zgb4

People with outstanding warrants and traffic fines in Seattle will have an opportunity to get them resolved on Thursday.

One of the halls at juvenile detention in Seattle. There are 212 beds but less than a quarter of those beds are used.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

King County wants your feedback on its efforts to jail fewer young people.

Flickr Photo/Brian Turner (CC BY 2.0)/ http://bit.ly/1QiDCKB

King County District Judge Lisa Paglisotti presides over a unique community court in Redmond. Instead of  sitting high up, looking down on a defendent, she's at eye level.

Burien Mayor Jimmy Matta on election night 2017, when he first was elected to the Burien City Council.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

The suspect, who police say perpetrated a racial attack on Burien Mayor Jimmy Matta, has turned himself in.

The 62-year-old could be charged with malicous harrasment, better known as a hate crime.

Matta said he was grabbed by the neck from behind and pushed to the ground and left bleeding Saturday while attending the Old Burien Block Party. 

Deputy Chief Carmen Best, left, and Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole listen as Mayor Jenny Durkan speaks during a press conference on Monday, December 4, 2017, at Seattle City Hall.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle’s Community Police Commission is asking the City Council to delay confirmation hearings for a new police chief until it can examine the selection process more closely.


Shakiah Danielson, center, dances with friends and family of Charleena Lyles during the one year remembrance, reflection and healing event on the anniversary of her death on Monday, June 18, 2018, at Magnuson Park in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

On a balmy Monday evening, children played games and danced in an open field at Sandpoint Magnuson Park. This would have resembled any other summer night were it not for all the people in t-shirts bearing one person's name: Charleena Lyles.

A main corridor at the King County juvenile detention center in Seattle's Central District. This building will be demolished after the new facility is constructed.
KUOW PHOTO/ISOLDE RAFTERY

Zero youth detention.

It's King County's white whale, a promise and a term batted around without much explanation of what it even means. 


A memorial for Charleena Lyles is shown outside of Solid Ground Brettler Family Place on Monday, June 19, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

It's been nearly a year since Seattle police officers shot and killed Charleena Lyles. 

Thursday, a panel of experts and a member of Lyles' family will gather at the University of Washington to talk about police violence and strategies to stop it. 


A main corridor at the King County Juvenile Detention in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Hear about those local clergy members who chained themselves to a construction site? They were protesting a new youth detention facility.

As you read this, new cinder block walls are rising up right next door to the old facility in Seattle’s Central District. The Children and Family Justice Center, its new name, is expected to be completed in 2020. 

Marijuana plants are shown in the flowering room at Grow Ambrosia in Seattle
KUOW Photos/Megan Farmer

A Seattle municipal court judge will decide if hundreds of marijuana convictions should be vacated after a request from Pete Holmes, the city attorney. 

If approved by the court, 542 people convicted of marijuana possession would have their records affected.

Elmer Dixon, left, laughs with Ben Abe, right, the current owner of the space where the Seattle Black Panther Party had their first office, while reminiscing about the location, on Wednesday, January 10, 2018, on 34th Avenue in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Madrona is a posh Seattle neighborhood with million-dollar homes. But 50 years ago, at the playground here, it was where hundreds of Black Panthers trained.

 


FILE: University of Washington Medical Center
Flickr Photo/I-5 Design & Manufacture (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8NiGU6

The University of Washington Medical Center says it will build a new facility to replace an aging inpatient psychiatric unit that’s slated for closure.

A memorial for Charleena Lyles is shown outside of Solid Ground Brettler Family Place on Monday, June 19, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

A Seattle nonprofit is no longer part of a lawsuit filed by the family of Charleena Lyles. A King County judge dismissed Solid Ground from the wrongful death suit Friday.

Superior Court Judge Julie Spector ruled that Solid Ground was not legally responsible for the police shooting.

Lawyers are more likely to strike people of color from their jury selection, research shows, making juries more white. The effect of predominantly white juries is well documented. 

Now Washington state’s highest court has adopted a new rule aimed at reducing this racial bias.


Seattle Black Panthers gather on the steps of the Capitol in Olympia on February 28, 1969, to protest a bill aiming to it a crime to exhibit firearms with 'an intent to intimidate others.'
Museum of History and Industry

Elmer Dixon walked up to the spot where the Black Panthers fortified a building against police attack and remembered the scene 50 years ago.


Patricia Murphy for KUOW

This week Dow Constantine, the King County executive, agreed to a debate on the Seattle Channel about the new youth jail. On Friday, activist and attorney Nikkita Oliver tweeted that she wouldn’t participate without a live audience.

The federal courthouse in downtown Seattle.
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

A Snohomish County man faces a federal charge alleging he sent nearly a dozen explosive packages to government agencies in the Washington, D.C. area.

Lindsay Church started Minority Veterans for America after leaving her position as post commander at Ballard's American Legion.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

When Navy veteran Lindsay Church was elected commander of American Legion Post 40 in Seattle's Ballard neighborhood, she looked around the room and saw the future. It didn't look promising.

“Basically what I was seeing was the post was dying,” Church said. 

Photography darkroom
Flickr Photo/Shankar S. (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/jEYZCV

Kathy Sauber makes her living taking pictures. But these days she’s having trouble concentrating on her work.

On a recent shoot, when a client wanted a specific photo set-up that Sauber knew wasn’t going to produce good results, she could barely hold it together. She felt anxious, angry and slightly out of control.

Brettler Family Place, part of the complex at Sand Point Housing.
Solid Ground

A citizens group wants the city of Seattle to investigate management of the low-income housing complex where Charleena Lyles was shot.

LaDonna Horne, center, is surrounded by family and friends during a vigil honoring her son, DaShawn Horne, on Saturday, Feb. 3, 2018, at Harborview Park in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Family members and friends are standing watch over a 26-year-old man who King County prosecutors say was the victim of an unprovoked racist attack last month.

DaShawn Horne remains in a medically induced coma at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle.

Tommy Le's family and attorneys announce their decision to file a $20 million wrongful death and civil rights violation lawsuit against King County, the King County Sheriff's Office and (former) Sheriff John Urquhart in 2017.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

Families of police shooting victims in King County will have a new voice during inquests.

The County Council agreed unanimously Monday to let these families have legal representation at these proceedings.


Patricia Murphy / KUOW

Is Washington state going to put an end to capital punishment?

The death penalty has been on hold since 2014 when Governor Inslee declared a moratorium on executions.

Hear an update on what lawmakers are up to from Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins. 

First, KUOW's Patricia Murphy was a media witness at the execution of the last person to put to death by the state.

Tommy Le's family and attorneys announce their decision to file a $20 million wrongful death and civil rights violation lawsuit against King County, the King County Sheriff's Office and (former) Sheriff John Urquhart in 2017.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

A new federal lawsuit says a King County sheriff’s deputy violated the civil rights of a man he shot to death last June.

Tommy Le's family and attorneys announce their decision to file a $20 million wrongful death and civil rights violation lawsuit against King County, the King County Sheriff's Office and (former) Sheriff John Urquhart in 2017.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

King County Executive Dow Constantine is hitting pause on all inquests into fatal shootings by law enforcement officers. 

The city of Seattle has settled a civil rights lawsuit from an activist of Latino descent who says he was unjustly arrested by several Seattle police officers during a rally downtown.

Co-director of HYPE, Charissa Eggleston, poses for a portrait on Saturday, August 5, 2017, at the Federal Way Boys & Girls Club in Federal Way. KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Earlier this year we told you about Kelli Lauritzen and Charissa Eggleston, two moms in Federal Way.

Alarmed at an outbreak of gun violence, they decided to act.


Dr. Ben Danielson in his office at the Odessa Brown Children's Clinic in Seattle's Central District.
KUOW photo/Patricia Murphy

In this tumultuous year, it’s been possible to wonder whether any progress will be made on racial equity.

But at the end of 2017, Dr. Ben Danielson said he’s seeing a shift in the conversation.


Rick Williams, brother of John T. Williams, who was shot and killed by a Seattle Police officer in 2010, after he testified at a House committee hearing in Olympia, Wash. in 2016, for a bill that would make it easier to charge police officers with crimes.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

A newly-formed committee will examine how the King County inquest process reviews officer-involved shooting and fatalities.

A main corridor at the King County Juvenile Detention in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Updated 5:54 p.m., 12/11/2017: The King County Council on Monday signaled a commitment to jailing fewer young people.

The council told County Executive Dow Constantine to use an expert report to guide county policy for reducing youth detention.

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